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Tom Balding Bits & Spurs

Bits and Pieces from Tom Balding Bits & Spurs

  • A History of Sheridan WYO Rodeo

    One of the biggest events to hit Sheridan every year is the Sheridan WYO Rodeo! The upcoming dates are July 11th - 17th, 2016.

    A History, by Tom Ringley (sited from sheridanwyorodeo.com)

    In 1931, the small town of Sheridan, Wyoming, was so quiet you could “shoot a shotgun down Main Street and have no fear of injuring anyone.” A group of local citizens wanted to do something about the situation and decided to put on a rodeo. They set their sights high and organized a first class professional rodeo on a par with other professional rodeos like the Cheyenne Frontier Days in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

    The committee started out from ground zero and had a huge challenge. Not only did the rodeo committee have to organize the rodeo from scratch, they had also to prepare the county fairgrounds facility that lacked the necessary amenities for a large professional rodeo. They sold capital stock to finance construction of additional seating, corrals, pens and bucking chutes among other things. To publicize the event, E. W. Bill Gollings was commissioned to paint a picture for the first Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo poster. The entire community and downtown merchants helped support the efforts of the rodeo committee to ensure the success of the first Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo.

    The first rodeo was a great success. The $15,000 purse brought professional rodeo contestants from all over the United States. A rodeo parade on Main Street drew thousands of spectators, and a carnival at the fairgrounds and participation of hundreds of Indians in night shows provided even more entertainment. The Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo was well established.

    From 1932 to 1941 the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo committee managed to stage a first class professional rodeo. It was not always easy. Frequent financial problems and public apathy often put the show in jeopardy.

    One year, 1933, the night show had to be cancelled for financial reasons. In the latter part of the decade, the committee was forced to find individuals in the community who were willing to underwrite the rodeo. But during this period, the rodeo committee still managed to make many facility improvements including a new grandstand in 1936. Other significant events occurred during this period; for instance, the Crow and Cheyenne Indian tribes smoked a pipe of peace in 1932 as part of the night show and the first Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo Queen was selected in 1936.

    Because of wartime conditions, the rodeo board found it impossible to conduct the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo in 1942 and 1943. But in 1944 the rodeo was reactivated with a number of changes. It was renamed the Bots Sots Stampede to invoke the memory of a series of rodeos in 1914-1916 called the Sheridan Stampede. Bots Sots is the Crow Indian term for “very good” and the term was used to advertise the Sheridan Stampedes of old. While there was still an Indian presence at the rodeo, large Indian pageants were replaced by vaudevillian night shows. The rodeo queen program was also reactivated and the rodeo parade and carnivals remained part of the program. The rodeo changed from professional status and was intended to be a “working cowboy” local rodeo, but contestant’s still entered from outside the local area.

    From 1944 to 1951 the rodeo gained momentum in terms of numbers of contestants and events and some of the largest attendance figures for the rodeo occurred during these years. But, the rodeo board still struggled to maintain merchant and community support and the financial condition of the rodeo was usually stretched thin.

    1951 was a watershed year for a number of reasons. One was that the public support seemed apathetic and as a result the rodeo was almost cancelled. A public poll was conducted to find if the community wanted the rodeo to continue. The public voted for continuation and also voted to restore the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo name. However, the rodeo remained a non-professional working cowboy rodeo. Merchants stepped up to the plate to support the effort and the rodeo continued.

    Another significant event in 1951 was that a Crow Indian, Lucy Yellow Mule, was elected rodeo queen by popular applause. This milestone event led to two national human relations award for Sheridan and the establishment of an annual All-American Indian Days, a nationally known Indian Pageant. The queen program was terminated when the last queen reigned in 1980.

    During the period from 1951 to 1967 the rodeo board continued to invest in the upgrade of the county fairgrounds that resulted in running water, proper toilet facilities, arena lighting, additional barns and other upgrades. In the mid 1960’s special entertainment at night became a thing of the past but the rodeo parade and carnival continued to be popular. Organized horse racing, a historic popular feature of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo also ended in the mid 1960’s because it became unsupportable.

    The Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo turned professional again in 1967 after the rodeo board determined the rodeo had become too large, too expensive and too long. In their words, they had “five days worth of rodeo and two days worth of audience”. The return to professional rodeo limited the contestants and streamlined the performance. The rodeo remains professional to this day. As in previous periods, the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo found itself in precarious financial condition and often a perceived lack of public support was cause for concern. In 1988, the rodeo was effectively cancelled because of reported grandstand safety issues, but was reinstated after temporary last minute repairs were performed on the structure. A new grandstand was constructed and has been in use since 1992.

    In 1975 “surrounding events” begin to appear. Events such as the Kiwanis Duck Race, the Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast, the Bed Race Along the Bighorns, the Boot Kick Off festivities, concerts at the historic Wyo Theater and downtown street dances have become an ingrained part of the now traditional “rodeo week”.

    In later years, much of the success of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo can be attributed to Sankey Pro Rodeo, the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo stock contractor since 1994. Ike and Roberta Sankey the owners, insure that the rodeo has the best livestock available and provide professional performance management that guarantees each Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo performance is top of the line rodeo action.

    After eighty years of evolution, the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo is today one of the premier Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) and Woman’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) rodeos in America. I The Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo prize money to contestants consistently ranks the rodeo in the top tier of over 600 PRCA rodeos that pay out over thirty million dollars each year.

    The future looks bright for the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo. The rodeo continues to draw capacity crowds. In fact, to cope with “ sell out” crowds, the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo Board of Directors decided to add a fourth night performance beginning in 2010. In addition, in 2010, the Board of Directors elected to join the PRCA Million Dollar Tour which will increase contestant prize money and ensure that the top rodeo contestants continue to perform at the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo.

    The key to the success of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo is financial support from sponsors. Major sponsors, M&M’s, Coca-Cola, Dasani, Pedigree and the Gold Buckle Club have joined with many local sponsors (The Posse) to help insure the continued success of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo.

    The Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo Gold Buckle Club was formed in 2005. It is a group of 250 private citizens who have a mutual desire to provide additional financial support. This dedicated group of supporters was responsible for an increase in contestant prize money in 2005 and the installation of air conditioning equipment and additional seating capacity for the Sheridan County Fairgrounds. In 2006, the Gold Buckle Club became an official major sponsor of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo.

    There is no doubt that with the unprecedented support of the community, the sponsors and Gold Buckle Club members and the dedicated work of the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo Board of Directors and the many volunteers, that the Sheridan-Wyo-Rodeo will remain one of the best rodeos in America and one of the most enduring traditions of the Sheridan, Wyoming community.

    To learn more about this great event please visit them online!

  • A Bit of Advice from Gina Miles

    A Bit of Advice from Gina Miles

    Olympic three-day eventer Gina Miles shares 10 tips for selecting an appropriate bit.

    By Holly Caccamise | December 2013 - This article originally appeared in the August 2011 issue of Horse Illustrated. Click here to subscribe.

    Selecting the correct bit is one of the most important parts of training your horse and bringing out his best performance. Here, Gina Miles, the 2008 Olympic individual silver medalist in three-day eventing, shares advice to help you navigate the many bits out there.

    Miles uses the following guidelines when deciding on a bit for a particular horse-and-rider combination.

    1. Use the simplest bit for the job.

    "Whenever I have a new horse in the barn or a new student, I first want to see how they go in a very basic double-jointed loose-ring snaffle,” says Miles.

    2. Always remember to go back to the basics.

    If you have been using other bits during show season, try going back to the basic double-jointed snaffle during a break from competition or over the winter. "It’s always a good idea to take a step back and see if your training has been effective and produced a more rideable, responsive horse,” says Miles.

    3. Use enough noseband to get the most out of your bit.

    "For a strong horse, try using a stronger noseband if it’s legal for your discipline before upgrading to a stronger bit,” says Miles. "Even a very strong bit won’t help you control your horse if his mouth is open.” Likewise, a very mild bit can be overused and make the horse dull in the mouth because he will open his mouth to escape the action. For dressage, jumpers and eventing, Miles recommends trying a flash, figure-eight or dropped noseband, each of which help keep the mouth closed more than a standard cavesson noseband.

    4. Find several bits you like and then alternate between them.

    A lot of times, a "new” bit works well because it feels different in the horse’s mouth. "The change in type of action can be just as effective as the action itself, so it’s a good idea to find two or three bits that work well for your horse and then change them around,” advises Miles. "It will keep your horse’s mouth ‘fresh’ and give you a little something extra every time you make a change.”

    5. Train in a milder bit than you use for shows.

    When you get to a competition, your horse is likely to be more excited and stronger, especially when jumping. "If you work on making your horse listen to your aids at home when practicing with less bit, you are more likely to have better success in controlling him when you are in a stressful situation,” says Miles.

    6. Compete in a bit that is strong enough to be effective.

    "If you get to the competition and you do not have enough bit to get your horse’s attention, you could end up being counter-productive in your training,” cautions Miles. "Frequently, horses that are under-bitted have riders who pull too much and don’t use enough leg.” This is a safety concern when jumping.

    7. Safety must always be a priority for riders.

    Horses are big, strong and potentially dangerous animals. Jumping cross-country requires that the rider has enough control to be safe. "When in doubt, I always err on the side of a stronger bit during cross-country,” says Miles, who takes care to ensure her students stay confident and in control. "Then they learn to use their leg and seat aids more effectively, which will ultimately reduce their dependence on the stronger bit.” When used correctly, a stronger bit lets you be lighter with your hands.

    8. Consider what type of action you are looking for when selecting a bit.

    The bit’s action is affected by the mouthpiece, ring shape and amount of leverage. Even a basic snaffle has a wide variety of mouthpieces to choose from; the most common are single-jointed and double-jointed. A single-jointed bit has more of a "nutcracker” action, and is therefore stronger than a double-jointed snaffle. For most horses, the double-jointed snaffle is more comfortable.

    "A Waterford mouthpiece can be combined with different types of rings and is good for horses that lock their poll and jaw,” says Miles. "Usually, horses are strong because they get rigid. The Waterford is excellent for suppling these types of horses.” The Waterford is not legal for dressage, however.

    Another strong snaffle mouthpiece (not legal for dressage) that is frequently combined with D-rings or full-cheek rings is the slow twist. Very severe bits, such as the double-twisted wire, should only be used by the most expert, forgiving hands.

    9. Types of bit rings include the eggbutt, loose-ring, full-cheek and D-ring.

    "Loose-ring bits are good for horses that are heavy on the bit or lock in their jaw and/or poll,” says Miles. "You usually need to go up a quarter to a half-inch in size from your regular bit to avoid pinching. You may also choose to use bit guards, although they are not legal for dressage.”

    Miles recommends the sturdy, more fixed rings of an eggbutt bit for horses that easily get pinched by loose rings or tend to chomp or play with the bit too much. Full-cheek bits and D-ring bits are traditional in the hunter ring, and full-cheek bits have the added advantage of giving you extra turning assistance, especially when used with bit keepers.

    10. If your horse is not responding appropriately to any of the snaffles, you can look to the leverage bits.

    "One of the questions you should ask yourself when considering a leverage bit is, ‘Do I want to get my horse’s head up or down?’” says Miles.

    If your horse tends to be high-headed, applying leverage to the poll and chin (via the curb chain) using a kimberwicke or Pelham will help correct this. If your horse dives down with his head too low, an elevator bit (also called a three-ring) will encourage him to raise his head.

    Regardless of which bit you use, remember that any bit can be as strong or severe as the hands it’s in. Also, over-bitting or overusing a bit can create fear and resentment in any horse, which may take professional training to undo. When in doubt, seek the advice of a respected trainer who is sympathetic to the needs of your horse as well as your riding.

    Meet the Trainer
    Gina Miles began riding at the age of 7 in Davis, Calif. A trip to the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles at age 10 confirmed to her that three-day eventing was the direction that her riding would take.

    In 1999, Thom Schultz and Laura Coates imported the 5-year-old Irish Sport Horse McKinlaigh for Miles to ride. In 2007, the pair earned a team gold medal and individual bronze at the Pan American Games in Brazil. In 2008, they won individual silver at the Beijing Olympic Games.

  • KEEPING YOU IN BITS AND SPUR

    KEEPING YOU IN BITS AND SPURS

    Have you bits or spurs by this weekend!

    We try to keep a moderate stock that is ready to ship out today! If you are looking for a particular combination we might have it already built up. The stock in our gift shop is always changing with purchases and new builds.

    To see if we have what you want in stock please call 307-672-8459 or email sales@tombalding.com. Thanks!

     

    20160223_141307 20160223_145008

  • THE NEW ADVANTAGE SHANKS

    THE NEW ADVANTAGE SHANKS

    After being hounded for a heavier shank, Tom came up the long and short Advantage shank. Tom used a heavy 3/8" stainless material for the shanks, adding considerable weight resulting in a better feel and faster response without changing our legendary balance. Any of the Advantage combinations are offered at $175. They are offered in two shank lengths; long 8 1/4" and short 7" with a satin finished stainless. If you would like a black, brown, or dots finish the price would be $275.

    BIT ADVANTAGE LONG SHANK CORRECTION STAINLESS CLEARED BIT ADVANTAGE LONG SHANK SQUARE PORT STAINLESS CLEARED BIT ADVANTAGE SHORT SHANK DOUBLE CROSS STAINLESS CLEARED BIT ADVANTAGE SHORT SHANK SQUARE PORT STAINLESS CLEARED

    Please contact us with ANY questions you might have!

    View this new line on our website!

  • A NOTE FROM THE TOM BALDING BITS & SPURS FAMILY

    A NOTE FROM THE TOM BALDING BITS & SPURS FAMILY

    Being part of the Tom Balding Bits & Spurs team is being part of a family. You feel loved and valued from the moment you walk in the door and are greeted with smiles, to the moment you are sent off for the day with well wishes for a good evening. Personal hardships are surrounded with support and personal accomplishments are celebrated.

    Each member of the team shares Tom's passion for the outdoors, family, community, and personal growth. The office and shop are not open over holidays or weekends, but instead the time is encouraged towards exploring the world, growing personal hobbies, and being with family and friends. We invite you to learn more about each team member on our 'meet the staff' page.

    As a customer you are highly valued and always treated with the utmost kindness, respect, and quality craftsmanship. Without you each of us would not be able to be a part of the Tom Balding Bits & Spurs family. We are all very grateful for the continued support as we look ahead to 2016!

    From our families to yours, we genuinely wish you a Holiday season filled with the ones you love.

    The Tom Balding Bits & Spurs Team

  • WHAT WE'RE MADE OF

    What we're made of

    Understanding the materials used in your horse's bits

     

    When we put something in our mouth it has a distinctive flavor and creates a reaction in us. We might spit it out, find it somewhat bland, or savor the flavor as long as possible. Your horse's mouth also reacts to a mouthpiece's different materials. Below is a quick and dirty list of materials used in bit mouthpieces and how they effect your horse. Please keep in mind that these are statements based on the majority and do not always apply to all horses. Just like you have (or are) that strange friend who likes to eat a lemon like an apple.... your horse could have unique tastes. Our mouthpieces are made of sweet iron and copper, as these two materials are easily accepted by most horses.

     Sweet Iron:

    Sweet iron is a mild steel that tends to rust over time. Rust on a mouthpiece is a good thing as it tends to increase a horse's salivation; much a like a piece of candy would in your mouth.  

    Copper:

    Copper offers a sweet taste that horses enjoy. It is better at increasing salivation than sweet iron; allowing an ease in acceptance. Copper is often formed into rollers that are attached to the port or bars of a mouthpiece. Rollers in the center of a mouthpiece give the horse something to play with and keep busy. Rollers on the bars will make a bit less sever as it offers ease in movement.

    Stainless Steel:

    Stainless steel will not rust; but is seldom used to form mouthpieces, because it does not have positive attributes in this application. Stainless is used in moving parts that need to have the endurance, such as internal rotating pins in the correction port. It is most commonly used on bit shanks rather then mouthpieces. Quality stainless steel should outlast you and your horse.

    Aluminum:

    Aluminum is the lightest metal material you will see used in mouthpieces. It has a short life as it tends to wear and pit over time. Horses do not accept it as well because of it's bitter taste and tenancy to dry out a horses mouth. 

    Rubber:

    Rubber is a soft material that allows flexibility and comfort. Because of its soft nature a center support is usually used in rubber mouthpieces that can damage a horses teeth and mouth if not checked regularly. It has a relatively short life span, but is a good option for horses with very sensitive mouths. 

    Nylon/plastic:

    Nylon is slightly more durable than rubber and offers some of the same attributes. It is a strong material that can stand on its own; without the use of a center support. It is not as durable as a metal mouthpiece and will not withstand a horse that likes to chew on its bits. 

    If you are having trouble with a horse accepting a bit it might pay off to look at the material it is made of and try something different. Typically you cannot go wrong with sweet iron or copper.

  • Not in a pinch...

    Not in a pinch...

    What it means when "non pinching" mouthpieces and bits are termed

    We have all heard it...."this bit is non pinching", "this is a pinch proof design", "pinchless designs are the only way to go", etc. What exactly are they saying? Lets look at this from a different angle. What is a pinching bit? A pinching bit is one that allows a horse's lip or cheek to get between moving parts, creating a "pinch". This can be very painful and cause negative behaviors in the horse.... can you blame the horse?

    A non pinching, pinch proof, or pinchless design would be one that does not allow for the space to get a lip or cheek in. To accomplish this a maker will need well thought out designs and precision execution of the builds. Quality material and craftsmanship should not wallow out, eliminating wear and spacing issues. Can anyone claim to have created a 100% pinch proof bit with moving parts? No. Our designs are non pinching; however, hinging parts that are used incorrectly can fold in on themselves enough to cause discomfort. Think of a hinged door; it is possible to pinch your finger in between the door and door frame when not used correctly. It is important to understand the basic functions of a bit to understand how a pinchless design can eliminate painful behavior forming riding.

    Ballhinges, d-rings, egg butts, correctly sized tubes, and solid shanks are all pinchless designs. Did you notice all of Tom's bits fit in these categories? He is also a master designer and craftsman, with aerospace experience, allowing him to create the highest allowable precision in the equine world. Our bits do not wobble and pinch, but rather glide with smooth balanced movements. We do not have a specifically named "non pinching" design because all of our designs are created with this in mind. It makes you wonder why other makers feel the need to name one design with this title and leave the others without....

  • Billy Klapper Style

    Billy Klapper Style

    How Billy Klapper has influenced Tom's bit and spur designs

    A little backgound on Billy Klapper: He trained with early spur masters such as Adolph Bayers and has spent his life perfecting the trade. He has over 680 patterns, but accommodates his customers wishes for custom designs. His first designs do not have his makers mark stamped in them. This was a process he started in 1966 by marking each with his name and a serial number. Based in Pampa Texas, he builds each spur from a solid piece of metal using a small coal forge. He is a one man operation and can turn out two hundred pair a year with a waiting list spanning well over a year.

    In an attempt to learn early on from the masters; Tom spent time visiting Billy Klappers workshop and discussing the processes he used. Billy Klapper spoke freely and took time to teach different techniques to Tom. The respect Tom has for Billy Klapper can be seen in his applications of the lessons learned. It is most evident in his Texas Style spur heelbands, spur shank 102 and 546, as well as the Klapper bit mouthpiece.

    SPUR STAINLESS PLAIN SHAP GUARD CLEARED TEXAS SATIN (3)

    SPUR STAINLESS PLAIN U ROWL CLEARED TEXAS (2)

    Steamboat klapper stainless hand engraved silver Brass brand cleared (2)

    When Tom was visiting Billy Klapper he hired a photographer to capture their time together. During the trip home someone broke into their car and stole the camera equipment, loosing the documentation forever. If anyone has ran across this film it would be a great treasure to Tom if returned.

  • THE ORIGINAL - downsides to knockoffs

    THE ORIGINAL - downsides to knockoffs

    The most obvious downside to purchasing a knock off is compromised quality. But what does that really mean. Let’s break it down....

    Our bits and spurs are precision built. Every finished part is within a couple thousandth of the original drawing. Because of this; there is limited wearing, no pinching, and fluid movement for the end user. Bits are perfectly balanced and spurs molded to your perfect fit. When other makers take our designs and knock them, off through an inexpensive process, you lose the commitment to perfection. The knockoff's are not built to the tolerances and specifications that ours are and therefore begin to wear in places, pinch your horse or boot, and stiffen/wobble when being used. Worst case scenario is a bit breaking while you are using it. With a knockoff, you are walking into the ‘danger zone’ the moment you take it home.

    Every design, down to the smallest part, is carefully considered before it is created into a working mock up. Then it is sent to world class trainers and professional riders for testing and feedback. Every comment is evaluated and then the design is changed accordingly. It is tested and retested, until we have something we are comfortable releasing to the general public. Every bit and spur offered comes with the industry leader’s stamp of approval.

    When you purchase a bit or spurs from us you are purchasing peace of mind for life. If the material or craftsmanship fail during your ownership, we will fix it or replace it at no cost to you. If the damage is on you (i.e. tie horse to post and it rears, bending the mouthpiece), we will still do our best to fix it for a minimal charge. Your satisfaction is our number one concern.

    The age old saying: "You get what you pay for", is ever valid. Ironically, you can buy one Tom Balding bit for a lifetime or a dozen knockoffs that last a couple years each. Why not get the good stuff the first time around and make your riding experience the best it can be?

    Tom has traveled to many of the companies that knock off his designs and asked if they would please stop. It hurts our business in both reputation (people think they have a Balding product but don't) and in sales (our ability to keep the doors open). A few ethical companies have ceased production when they meet Tom and see he is committed to his quality product and learn how small our shop family really is. Partrade is one of these upstanding companies and Tom has maintained a friendly relationship with them ever since.

    We hope you begin to have a trained eye for quality. Here are some great examples to help sharpen your skills in spotting knockoffs.

    4 3 21

  • 2015 Customer Survey Results

    2015 customer survey results

    What did you have to say about Tom Balding Bits & Spurs?

    We have summarized your responses in a per questions style. Also, all questions or directional responses have been answered. We cannot thank each of you enough for participating in this live feedback! Your comments and suggestions are being worked into our daily operations as you are reading this.

     

    Q: Please rank our four core values in importance to you.

    A: #1 Attention to craftsmanship, design, and materials. #2 Quality and pride in everything we do. #3 Care and respect for one another and the community. #4 Elite product that sets the standard in our industry.

     

    Q: Do you agree with this statement? "We craft state of the art bit and spur designs backed by industry leading technology and innovation for riders seeking a balanced product that offers ease of use, quick response, better movement, and longer product life. We work directly with world class professional riders and trainers to ensure all your needs are met. We are the best, and thought often copied we are never duplicated."

    A: 97.91% agreed with this statement and 2.09% did not.

     

    Q: How many times have you used our trial bit program to "try before you buy" in the last 24 months?

    A: 61.26% said never, 32.46% said 'What is the trial bit program', and 6.28% responded they had used trial bits between 1-3 times.

    NOTE: We offer a trial bit service for customers to try before they buy. We understand this is an investment and want to ensure you are 100% satisfied with the bit you purchase. Just give us a call or email us with your mouthpiece requests and we will send you the bits to try for up to two weeks.

     

    Q: How often will you purchase the following items for yourself and your tack room this year?

    A: Ranked from most often to least often they replies are as follows: Grooming equipment, Bit, Reins, Saddle Blanket, Headstall, Boots, Sterling Silver Items, Hat, Spurs, and Saddle.

     

    Q: How likely is it that you would recommend Tom Balding Bits & Spurs to a friend or colleague?

    A: 84% would highly recommend, 10% we moderately likely to recommend, and 6% had a low probability of recommending.

     

    Q: What new products or designs would you like to see from us?

    A: Most were very happy with our offering and did not have specific suggestions. Listed below are the suggestions we did receive along with notes from our team.

    • Jewelry - We do offer a fair amount of jewelry in our gift shop. However, because of the one of a kind nature of these pieces we are not able to offer them all on our website. They are continually changing and up to the engraver and artist's whims. In addition to the photos we post on Facebook of these items, we are happy to email pictures of what we have along a particular line for you. We do have a section dedicated to jewelry on our website which you can view here
    • Belts, hat bands, saddles, and other custom leather pieces - While we greatly appreciate the art of leather craft we do not do it in our shop. We carry one of a kind pieces from a local maker, by the name of Wayne Hape, in our gift shop. These items follow the same treatment as our jewelry. 
    • Reins, headstalls, and other tack items - Though we do not make tack items in our shop we do try to carry a wide selection. You can view these items here. Along these lines it was noted that a particular style or material was requested. We are somewhat limited by our suppliers but will be looking into many of these options in the next year.
    • Short shank bits (to transition from a snaffle) - We offer many short shanks as buy it now options on our website as well as the ability to build your bit exactly as you want it (catalog). 
    • Tablespoon shaped high port mouthpiece, western snaffle, half breed, and spade mouthpieces - We offer many mouthpieces that fit these descriptions. You can view all of our mouthpieces here. If you have questions about any of the mouthpieces please contact us and we will respond within one business day (usually much sooner!).  
    • Larger/wider mouthed trial bits - With the large number of mouthpieces we offer it would have to be narrowed down to a single selection case by case option. It would not be possible to accommodate all possible, non standard, mouth widths in our trial bit program. It might be a case of roughly mocking up the bit for you to try and then putting the finishes on it for you once you knew it was something you wanted. 
    • More design overlay options / would like to design my own and have you make it - With our almost unlimited combinations (shanks, mouthpieces, finishes, and custom overlays) we try and make that possible for you. Please visit our catalog for per piece options. With regard to you drawing up something completely unique (i.e. palm tree shanks and guitar shaped mouthpiece bars) and then having us build that for you, it is simply not possible. Because of our high quality standards we spend almost a year refining and testing every shank and mouthpiece before releasing it to the general public. We would be happy to overlay palm trees and guitars on your bit or spur though! Along these same lines we do not copy other makers. We have had several request to copy a favored bit for someone, but we just do not feel right taking someone's hard work and marketing it under our name.
    • Non stainless heart design rowels - We will have these available very soon! Please feel free to place an order at your convenience.
    • High quality hackamore bit - At this time Tom is not researching a hackamore bit. If anything on this front changes we would be happy to contact you. Please email us with your contact information and we will touch base with you if he does come out with one down the road. Another great maker that does currently build hackamore bits is Gordy Alderson
    • Flank buckles, bridle buckles, other tack hardware - This is something that we have looked into but would not be able to devote the time needed to produce these on an order by order basis. Our shop manager, Justin Massar, does a fair amount of side work with small custom items for people. He would be a wonderful resource if you have a specific request to be filled. We highly endorse his work ethic and craftsmanship! 
    • Bit hangers - We currently offer metal bit hangers and are looking into wood hangers for both bits and spurs. To order the metal hangers please contact us as they are not for sale on our website. We will be posting the wood displays as soon as they are available. 
    • Key chain - We offer many styles of key chains. You can view them here.
    • Lower priced options - We offer our baseline as a economy line. You can view them here.
    • Traditional Californian mouth and cheek pieces (i.e. c-port mouth) - Tom's style is not overly ornate and traditional so this is not a direction we will be going. We have been thinking of a straight shank but it would a year or more before this comes about.
    • More overlay option (floral patterns etc) - We can cut anything out that you would like on your bits or spurs. Your only limits are the size of the space you have to work with. 
    • Smaller/larger mouthpieces besides the standard 5 1/8"- We offer custom mouth widths for a small up charge. You pick the width and we will built it for you. For more information on this please visit our blog "a bits perfect fit".  
    • Ladies spurs - We offer our spurs in mens, ladies, and youth sizes. When you tell us your boot size we then further customize the bend to fit you perfectly. For more information on sizing please visit our blog post "a spurs perfect fit". 
    • Barrel racing, Cowhorse, etc bits - Our bits fall into many disciplines. It is up to you to determine your needs within your specific discipline set. We do try and give you direction through our "is this bit legal" blog post. Other great resources are your disciplines rule books, as they are updated every year. 
    • Stirrups - We do not carry stirrups and do not have plans at this time to introduce them as this is something typically purchased with a saddle or saddle maker. 
    • More stainless steel options - All of our bit and spur pieces are offered in stainless. Our mouthpieces however are sweet iron and copper which aids in salivation and acceptance.
    • Lightweight bits - We are researching different aluminum bit options for our shop. It may be a couple years before something is released to the general public. 
    • Trophy bits, spurs, or buckles - We offer all three! You can see examples here.
    • Full sized shank bottle opener - We are toying around with this and should have something out by mid to end of this year. 
    • Knives - We sell a few knives in the gift shop by other makers. We do not have plans to make knives in our shop.
    • English bits  - We offer several styles of English bits including full cheek snaffles, D-ring snaffles, and Pelhams. We also offer a variety of polo specific bits
    • Stones on the bits - To inlay stone stones on our bits we have to design overlay plates. We have done this for the Sheridan shank which you can view here. If this continues to grow in popularity we will look into other shank overlays that allow for stones.
    • Limited edition bits and spurs - We are working on great one of a kind (highest bidders) items for 2016.
    • Bit buying/using guide - We try and present a wealth of information on our blog from our experience with trainers and professional riders. However, many opinions vary so greatly, as well as the general difference between different riders and their horses, that it is hard to offer a 'one-size-fits-all' bit guide. We will certainly look into a way to offer a one stop guide in the upcoming years. 

     

    Q: How often would you like to hear from us?

    A: The most common answer (by far) was monthly.

     

    Q: What year was TBBS established?

    A: The correct answer is 1984. 83% had the correct answer.

     

    Q: Do you have any other comments, questions, or concerns?

    A: We felt the love of so many kind and positive responses! Thank you!!!  Below we have listed responses that were seeking replies or additional information that were not already addressed above.

    • More information on bit uses and which bit is best for which rider - Because there is such a variety in riders, horses, and learned styles it is very hard to give general suggestions to the public. We do try, through phone conversation and our blog, to offer very general advise. However, we often suggest either the trial bits or working with a trainer for more specific suggestions to each rider and horse. 
    • More non-Facebook contests - We offer a tab on our website filled with all our contests. This tab is updated continually as contest change throughout the year. 
    • Information about the team - We love that you want to know about us as individuals! We offer brief profiles of each employee on our 'Meet the staff' tab'. 
    • The ability to order a fully custom bit (whichever mouthpiece and shank) on the website - The 'Bit Creator' will hopefully by live this summer. We are sure this will quickly become a favorite page! 
    • Which bits are show legal to a specific discipline - We combed through rule books a while back and compiled the "Is this bit legal" blog post. This answers many of the major questions regarding different associations. We also offer for you to comment if you are looking for or have found additional associations you would like cited in the post. As always you are welcome to call or email us if you need a little help identifying your disciplines rules and legal bits. 
    • Can I have a bit made with my brand on the cheek? - You bet! We can put anything you like on the wider shanks or concho snaffles. Your only limitation is the size of the bit surface area. 

     

    If your questions were not answered here or you have additional thoughts please share through the comment form below!

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Look for the "Tom Balding" stamp on every bit and spur, and be confident it's the mark of an original. All looks, designs, names, and website content TM and © by Tom Balding Bits and Spurs. All Rights Reserved. The Balding looks, names and designs are protected under US Trademark law, US Copyright law and/or International Treaty. Reproduction or imitation is prohibited by law.